Women, Art and Authority: The Language of Exclusion

A must read.

Jeanne de Montbaston

I recently watched Amanda Vickery’s series, ‘The Story of Women and Art,’ which you can catch on Iplayer (and catch it soon, before it goes).

I am a pretty obvious target for this series. The name I blog under, Jeanne de Montbaston, is the name of one of the few medieval women artists about whom we know a fair amount. I’m not an Art Historian, but I’m very interested in women artists, because in medieval England (and France, and Italy …), you often find that the people illuminating books –  or making tapestries and other works of art we’ve now lost – were women. I suspect that the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries were actually a reasonably good time to be a woman artist. Yet, ironically, I suspect that’s true for women like Jeanne de Montbaston simply because being an artist who illuminated medieval manuscripts did not carry the…

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here’s how it ends

A must read.

phonaesthetica

In a hospital cafeteria last week, an old man stood ahead of me in line for oatmeal. He reminded me of my dad, except he couldn’t use his hands very well. Oatmeal was getting everywhere and he looked embarrassed yet friendly, so I asked if he was at the hospital for physical therapy.

He said no. His daughter had died upstairs that morning of anorexia.

He was alone and so was I, so we ate together. Straightening his sugar packets in a careful pile, he told me about his daughter, who’d been my age – such a happy baby; such a bright girl – but when she was 15 she got funny about food and exercise; her weight; they spent a small fortune on rehab and counselors and some days she seemed better but other days worse.

Days became years. She wore people out.  He finally let her go, to do what she was going to do. He was sad but not…

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I have a new site, part II

purplesilvercoppersig

 

I have a new website, mkhajdin.com, but for some reason it’s not turning up when I google myself.  Instead, I get my Twitter and this blog!   So once again, in case you got here by googling “M.K. Hajdin”, or even “MK Hajdin” as they prefer in the UK (what is it with their dislike of periods?  Anyway) that link will take you straight to my new site, where my artworks are all a lot bigger.  Go there.

If you’re just here for my feminist posts or Clyfford Still, you’re fine.

How to buy inexpensive abstract art

I wrote a blog post for my main site about how to understand the pricing range of inexpensive art.  I define “inexpensive” in the art world as ranging from $25 – $3000, and I explain what you are likely to find at each price point, along with examples of artworks you can buy and sites where you can find more artworks for similar prices.

Just click my link below:

How to buy cheap abstract art

Mostly works for representational art too.

 

Illuminating the “Dark Matter” of the Art World

This is brilliant:

There are many parallels between the “physics of aesthetics” and the world of regular physics.  For example, astrophysicists tell us that within our own universe ninety percent of the material out there emits no light, and is therefore called “dark matter.”  Yet because of the huge amount of this “dark matter” it obviously produces the bulk of forces which though invisible, nevertheless shapes and influences the nature and destiny of our cosmos.

Likewise in our art universe most of the artists and their production are invisible to the broadest sections of society.

 

Read the rest of Loren Munk’s article here and have a look at his work.